The Learning Network, an educational program of the NY Times, recently used one of my pieces to illustrate the word “wizened”. Nailed it!

The architecture of the naked trees is now the star of the forest. There is our black birch, with dark chinks in its steely gray bark. A knobby burl creates a humpback and an elbowed branch seems to flex its muscle.

Chestnut oaks are crooked and angular. Their dark bark is rugged and blocky, giving even younger trees a wizened look. I can’t resist exploring this craggy terrain with my hands. These oaks lack lower branches, a common feature of trees that grow up in the forest where competition for light is steep.

Could this humble plant be responsible for heartbreak? You bet - my New York Times opinion piece on love, loss and a wildflower.

Could this humble plant be responsible for heartbreak? You bet - my New York Times opinion piece on love, loss and a wildflower.

With the change of seasons, we say goodbye to spring & my NY Times series: “The Last Day of Spring”.  Happy Summer!

With the change of seasons, we say goodbye to spring & my NY Times series: “The Last Day of Spring”.  Happy Summer!

nybg:

Who wants to join me for a road (er train) trip to see Ellsworth Kelly Plant Drawings at The Metropolitan Museum of Art? Kelly’s drawings are spare and spartan, and yet full of warmth and dimension. There is something about them that alludes to the story behind them, an idea I had before I read this glowing review of the small exhibition in the New York Times (plants, it seems, are having a major moment in New York City this summer).
As someone who loves taking pictures of my plants as a way to remember not just what I thought was beautiful, but in order to remember what I wasfeelingat that time, I kind of figured there was more to Kelly’s art than mere botanical art. So, who’s up for a quick gallery visit?~AR

nybg:

Who wants to join me for a road (er train) trip to see Ellsworth Kelly Plant Drawings at The Metropolitan Museum of Art? Kelly’s drawings are spare and spartan, and yet full of warmth and dimension. There is something about them that alludes to the story behind them, an idea I had before I read this glowing review of the small exhibition in the New York Times (plants, it seems, are having a major moment in New York City this summer).

As someone who loves taking pictures of my plants as a way to remember not just what I thought was beautiful, but in order to remember what I wasfeelingat that time, I kind of figured there was more to Kelly’s art than mere botanical art. So, who’s up for a quick gallery visit?~AR

nybg:

nycdigital:

New York City Department of Parks & Recreation just unveiled a new view of our city. The interactive map displays markers for each time a visitor checks in to one of over 1,250 NYC Parks locations using the foursquare mobile app. These visitors can get tips of fun and interesting…

The Garden is not on this map (which I think is really cool), because as a botanical garden, we are not a park. But that shouldn’t keep you from checking-in at the Garden or at any of our gardens and exhibitions. ~AR


The next morning, we find the ground strewn with flowers — a gift from the storm. They have been wrested from the leafy canopy of tulip trees, which at our site are well over 100 feet tall. 

Week 8 of spring in my NY Times series

The next morning, we find the ground strewn with flowers — a gift from the storm. They have been wrested from the leafy canopy of tulip trees, which at our site are well over 100 feet tall. 

Week 8 of spring in my NY Times series

nybg:

Taylor Kubota of Science Online has a terrific Q&A with NYBG’s Dean and Vice President for Science, James S. Miller. He even divulges one of the coolest parts of being a botanist: You get to name plants after your family members!

I’m brimming with botanical pride!

Poetry Pairing for Spring

New York Times Learning Network paired my piece on spring with a poem by Li-Young Lee called, “Secret Life” - I love it!

New York Times series: “Spring Comes to a NYC Woodland”

The frame of the photograph above will not change between now and the summer solstice on June 20. But everything within it will.

New York Times series: “Spring Comes to a NYC Woodland”

The frame of the photograph above will not change between now and the summer solstice on June 20. But everything within it will.

If so, please come and say hello. I’m speaking with the amazing Yasser Ansari of Project Noah on building connections to nature in urban environments on Friday. See you in Austin!